Drew Nugent and the Midnight Society

Will Downing

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis

The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis (JLCO) comprises 15 of the finest jazz soloists and ensemble players today. Led by Wynton Marsalis, Jazz at Lincoln Center Managing and Artistic Director, this remarkably versatile orchestra performs a vast repertoire ranging from original compositions and Jazz at Lincoln Center-commissioned works to rare historic compositions and masterworks by Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Fletcher Henderson, Thelonious Monk, Mary Lou Williams, Dizzy Gillespie, Benny Goodman, Charles Mingus, and many others. The JLCO has been the Jazz at Lincoln Center resident orchestra since 1988, performing and leading educational events in New York, across the United States, and around the globe. Alongside symphony orchestras, ballet troupes, local students, and an ever-expanding roster of guest artists, the JLCO has toured over 300 cities across six continents. Guest conductors have included Benny Carter, John Lewis, Jimmy Heath, Chico O’Farrill, Ray Santos, Paquito D’Rivera, Jon Faddis, Robert Sadin, David Berger, Gerald Wilson, and Loren Schoenberg. The JLCO was voted best Big Band in the annual DownBeat Readers’ Poll four years in a row (2013–2016).

In 2015, Jazz at Lincoln Center announced the launch of Blue Engine Records, a new platform to make its archive of recorded concerts available to jazz audiences everywhere. The first release from Blue Engine Records, Live in Cuba, was recorded on a historic 2010 trip to Havana by JLCO and was released in October 2015. Big Band Holidays was released in December 2015, The Abyssinian Mass came out in March 2016, and The Music of John Lewis came out in March 2017. Handful of Keys, featuring a group of all-star guest pianists, arrived in September 2017. To date, 14 other recordings featuring the JLCO have been released and internationally distributed: Vitoria Suite (2010); Portrait in Seven Shades (2010); Congo Square (2007); Don’t Be Afraid…The Music of Charles Mingus (2005); A Love Supreme (2005); All Rise (2002); Big Train (1999); Sweet Release & Ghost Story (1999); Live in Swing City (1999); Jump Start and Jazz (1997); Blood on the Fields (1997); They Came to Swing (1994); The Fire of the Fundamentals (1993); and Portraits by Ellington (1992). Visit jazz.org for more information.

Wynton Marsalis (Trumpet) is the managing and artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center and a world-renowned trumpeter and composer. Born in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1961, Marsalis began his classical training on trumpet at age 12, entered The Juilliard School at age 17, and then joined Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers. He made his recording debut as a leader in 1982, and has since recorded more than 60 jazz and classical recordings, which have won him nine Grammy Awards. In 1983, he became the first and only artist to win both classical and jazz Grammys in the same year and repeated this feat in 1984. Marsalis is also an internationally respected teacher and spokesman for music education, and has received honorary doctorates from dozens of U.S. universities and colleges. He has written six books; his most recent are Squeak, Rumble, Whomp! Whomp! Whomp!, illustrated by Paul Rogers and published by Candlewick Press in 2012, and Moving to Higher Ground: How Jazz Can Change Your Life with Geoffrey C. Ward, published by Random House in 2008. In 1997, Marsalis became the first jazz artist to be awarded the prestigious Pulitzer Prize in music for his oratorio Blood on the Fields, which was commissioned by Jazz at Lincoln Center. In 2001, he was appointed Messenger of Peace by Mr. Kofi Annan, Secretary-General of the United Nations, and he has also been designated cultural ambassador to the United States of America by the U.S. State Department through their CultureConnect program. Marsalis was instrumental in the Higher Ground Hurricane Relief concert, produced by Jazz at Lincoln Center. The event raised more than $3 million for the Higher Ground Relief Fund to benefit the musicians, music industry-related enterprises, and other individuals and entities from the areas in Greater New Orleans who were affected by Hurricane Katrina. Marsalis helped lead the effort to construct Jazz at Lincoln Center’s home—Frederick P. Rose Hall—the first education, performance, and broadcast facility devoted to jazz, which opened in October 2004.

Odean Pope’s Saxophone Choir feat. Pharoah Sanders and James Carter

Veteran Philadelphia Saxophonist Odean Pope makes a rare appearance with his renowned Saxophone Choir at the Philadelphia Clef Club of Jazz. Performing with Pope with sax legends Pharoah Sanders and James Carter.

Joanna Pascale: The Language of Flowers

As a Kimmel Center Jazz Resident Artist in 2017, Joanna Pascale created this very personal exploration of how we communicate our thoughts and feelings to others using flowers. We give them to each other to celebrate happy occasions, express sympathy, or offer love. Working with theater director Ellie Heyman, Joanna takes us on a journey to find out what we’re really trying to say with our bouquets.

Floriography is the art of communicating sentiment and emotion through flowers. It gained popularity during the Victorian Era (1837-1901) when open expressions of emotion were culturally unacceptable. Flowers were assigned meanings to express feelings that could not be spoken aloud. Small bouquets called “talking bouquets” were created and used to send coded messages to the recipient. Due to the insanely long list of flowers, dictionaries began to be published to help people decipher the hidden intentions within a floral bouquet.

The presence of floriography reveals itself in art, literature, poetry and religion. In Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Ophelia is filled with intense emotion. Since speaking her mind might lead to her demise, she uses the secret language of flowers. “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray you, love, remember.” She goes on about pansies, rosemary and violets. Though people think she’s crazy, she’s actually using floriography.

“Listen with your eyes and then sing everything you see.”
– Captain Noah

Who is Joanna?
Lyric is paramount for Philadelphia-based vocalist Joanna Pascale, who insists that she cannot perform a song unless she can connect personally with its lyrics. Once she’s found that connection, there’s no one who can better convey the emotion of those words more directly and intimately than Pascale. That gift is in ample evidence on Pascale’s release, Wildflower, on which she’s joined by an all-star ensemble including pianists Orrin Evans and Cyrus Chestnut, harmonica master Gregoire Maret, bassists Christian McBride, and neo-soul singer Bilal. The recording of Wildflower coincided with the end of Pascale’s decade-long engagement at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel, which allowed her to hone her voice, style, and vast repertoire. A singer of sophisticated taste, profound expressiveness, and raw emotion, Pascale is also a gifted educator who is a member of the vocal faculty at the University of Pennsylvania and also teaches in the Creative Music Program at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts. She’s been featured on recordings by Jeremy Pelt, Tim Warfield, Orrin Evans, Larry McKenna, the Temple University Jazz Band, and Garry Dial and Dick Oatts. Pascale made her recording debut with 2004’s When Lights Are Low, followed by the 2008 Through My Eyes and a 2010 duo recording with pianist Anthony Wonsey released on her Stiletto Records label. She holds a BA from Temple University and currently teaches and performs internationally.

Odean Pope’s Saxophone Choir feat. Pharoah Sanders and James Carter

Veteran Philadelphia Saxophonist Odean Pope makes a rare appearance with his renowned Saxophone Choir at the Philadelphia Clef Club of Jazz. Performing with Pope with sax legends Pharoah Sanders and James Carter.

Odean Pope’s Saxophone Choir feat. Pharoah Sanders and James Carter

Veteran Philadelphia Saxophonist Odean Pope makes a rare appearance with his renowned Saxophone Choir at the Philadelphia Clef Club of Jazz. Performing with Pope with sax legends Pharoah Sanders and James Carter.

Kevin Eubanks Quartet

Kevin Eubanks, the Philadelphia native who took New York by storm starting out in straight ahead jazz clubs then progressive albums for contemporary jazz giant GRP Records and legendary Blue Note Records, frequent collaborations with cutting edge bassist Dave Holland, then 18 years in Jay Leno’s “The Tonight Show” Band (15 as Music Director) where he played with seemingly every meaningful musician across genres.

Odean Pope’s Saxophone Choir feat. Pharoah Sanders and James Carter

Veteran Philadelphia Saxophonist Odean Pope makes a rare appearance with his renowned Saxophone Choir at the Philadelphia Clef Club of Jazz. Performing with Pope with sax legends Pharoah Sanders and James Carter.

Pianist, Christian Sands & His Trio